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THE BROTHER HATE TO DOLLAR CONVERSION RATE, EXPLAINED

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THIS IS SOUND ECONOMICS AND YOU CAN QUOTE IT IN A TERM PAPER

Nelson Chenault-USA TODAY Sports

The Idaho head coach job is not a great gig right now. The program's getting kicked out of the Sun Belt, hasn't been to a bowl since 2009, and finished behind Yale, Eastern Michigan, and North Texas in this year's recruiting rankings. The open job of Louisville offensive coordinator, on the other hand, is pretty interesting! You get a bunch of returning starters and, if the last guy's the baseline, about twice as much money as you do to lead the Vandals.

Given that balance, you would think Paul Petrino would happily make the jump from Moscow to Louisville - but he isn't. It could be he thinks the honorable thing is to coach out the season with his players rather than abandon them. Petrino might be trying to avoid appearing to rely on nepotism rather than succeeding on his own merits. He might even be hesitant to follow Bobby Petrino to the L.A. Rams in 2017. [NOTE: Make sure to delete that last sentence until the Rams have given us the green light to break that news]

Or it could just be the obvious: Paul Petrino totally hates his brother. In fact, he hates him so much that we can quantify it in dollars. Paul Petrino hates Bobby Petrino more than he would enjoy $437,000. How hateful is that? Let's go to this very official graph!

As you can see, if you decide you don't want to work for your brother and you're only looking at a small raise, it's not necessarily indicative of any animosity. Even at the $10,000 additional annual salary level, you can turn down that job simply because you'd feel weird having your brother being your boss, not because you dislike him. But as you get close to six figures, it's harder to argue that this is simply a matter of finding a good job fit.

Therefore, to turn down a raise of $437,000, Paul Petrino spends about 100 days a year thinking about murdering Bobby Petrino. That's a lot for anybody with a sibling, but when you consider the time demands involved in being a college football head coach, it's absolutely astonishing. Watch your back, Bobby, and consider wearing a Kevlar vest to Thanksgiving dinner.