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THE FIVE WORST SI SPORTSPERSONS OF THE YEAR

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HONESTLY, WHAT WERE YOU THINKING, SPORTS ILLUSTRATED

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Today, Sports Illustrated named Serena Williams their 2015 Sportsperson of the Year, a decision which some hippophiles objected to, strongly. There's some debate over whether the magazine made the best choice every year, but we think Serena's an excellent pick. We don't always agree with the SI editors, however. Here are the five worst Sportspersons of the Year from the Sports Illustrated archives.

1960. Sure, SI had no way of knowing what Olympic gold medalist Cassius Clay had in store, but it's hard to justify Joseph Corbett, Jr. winning the honor just for kidnapping -- and eventually murdering -- beer empire heir Adolph Coors III.

1971. The Chevrolet Vega was neither designed nor used for racing, and it eventually developed a reputation as a car that would overheat, rust far too easily, and present serious safety concerns. We can't understand how Sports Illustrated's editors justified picking it for Sportsman of the Year.

1986. There's no denying Michael Caine had a great 1986, winning an Academy Award and appearing in two films related to prostitution (Mona Lisa and Half Moon Street), but what does that have to do with sporting achievement? Hard to explain.

1998. Though Mark McGwire's become the athlete from this cover we criticize most harshly, let's not forget that Pikachu wasn't even the most deserving Pokemon of that season. (That would be Bulbasaur.)

2009. Easily the most embarrassing selection in the magazine's history. New York City's subway may have longevity on its side, but this shouldn't be a lifetime achievement award. Also, we have no idea who this guy is on the cover. A conductor, maybe?